Author Topic: Article regarding brain dumping  (Read 2412 times)

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Transk53

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Article regarding brain dumping
« on: February 01, 2012, 09:39:56 am »
Pinched this linkage from another site. Good article though and not even I would imagine brain dumping is that rife. And is the problem now. As the corporate world has accepted these brain dumping companies, to peddle their wares, it will almost certainly continue. Surely though, should CompTIA not have by now a proper framework with which to stop these thefts of IP. I for one do not mind posting that I chose to borrow a significant amount of money with which to gain certification, so as I am concerned, I can take the moral high ground. However, while I can claim that I have not ripped anybody off, asserting that anybody using brain dump material as being ignorant is wrong in my opinion. If you blatantly rip a CD/DVD or whatever with material, that is theft obviously. If you managed to copy official examination material, then that is also theft. Anybody downloading content from a site that looks good with free practice stuff is going to be hit heavily obviously. Therein lies the problem with IP and where it was sourced and how it is presented. That is the problem with the internet, too many people and organizations winging about this and that without actually having anything tangible to say. At least the cert guard is a right step forward and I certainly advocate that. I also advocate the idea that CompTIA or whomever, need to address this situation with brain dumping and create a framework where companies cannot proffer such course materials that are proven to be of a dubious source. Brilliant idea to stop people getting certification like that and I applaud that. However, the cert guard exists due to CompTIA ignorance over brain dumping and the fact that companies can still use stolen source material for the A+ (working example). If CompTIA had thought that having to re cert every three years will in any way solve the piracy, it won’t.

http://www.networkworld.com/community/node/25581

Bill

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Re: Article regarding brain dumping
« Reply #1 on: February 01, 2012, 10:54:39 am »
CompTIA, Microsoft, Cisco, and the other cert authorities can only do so much. They claim to be able to watch for certain patterns in exam behavior, I'm not real sure how that part of it works, but there's a lot of the aspects of the braindump industry (for lack of a better term) that is entirely out of their control.

To begin with, you'll see people throughout the forums openly inquiring about access to actual exam questions and answers. It's pretty sad really to see someone with so little self-esteem that they feel they have to cheat their way through an exam, and still believe that that they're going to somehow make it in the real world without the proper training and knowledge necessary to actually do the job.

Many of these braindump providers actually operate in third world countries or under the watchful eye of a corrupt government or legal system. Many provide material that is outdated, irrelevant, or simply illegally distributed and have no concerns of prosecution or reprimand.

The individual that has been duped into purchasing this type of material has no recourse either. Regardless of the companies promises of a guaranteed pass or full refund if not satisfied, there is simply no recourse for the individual. If they attempt to press the issue, then they admit to cheating and likely lose any certification they might presently hold and disqualify themselves from any future certification.

I'm not against practice exams by any means, in fact I'm a proponent of any quality practice material. I do try to verify every resource I can against the database at CertGuard before recommending or posting a link, I've known the folks there for some time now and admire their efforts.

Cheating is nothing new, it's been done in one fashion or another since long before my time. And I suppose it will go on long after I'm gone. I suppose the best we can do is try to steer others away from the use of braindumps and hope that someone will appreciate our efforts as well.
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Transk53

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Re: Article regarding brain dumping
« Reply #2 on: February 01, 2012, 01:52:18 pm »
That is some reply. I must thank you for the post. I did realise the third world element, that would make a lot of sense from the criminal point of view. It would garuntee the money. It does piss me off when a person of lesser skill bags a job through pure and simple rhetoric. I for one, like it to feel real, even if it is failure, it keeps you real. Maybe that is where I fall down sometimes, but I would rather know that I have addressed the fundamentals but fail, than acchieve a false victory.

In terms of what can be done, would be quite simple for CompTIA. Official tie ups with training providers. Or is that just too simple as an objective?

Bill

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Re: Article regarding brain dumping
« Reply #3 on: February 01, 2012, 02:55:39 pm »
Official tie ups with training providers.
Actually, that's not as simple as it would seem. There would have to be some sort of regulations or guidelines established for the authorized training providers. This means establishing some sort of oversite on the part of CompTIA, Microsoft, and the lot to ensure training is provided in a proper fashion. This in turn translates to higher costs for certification.

Even as things are now, you quite often horror hear stories of people looking for work and needing advanced training, then entering into contracts with providers because they've been promised that in a few short months they'll become a certified MCSE or they'll be placed in a job making an exorbitant amount of money when in reality, they end up oweing more than they can afford.

A lot of the people looking to become certified are new to the industry, recently unemployed or just out of school, and really cannot afford the added expense of a training provider. For the individual already employed in a tech position and needs additional certifications to comply with company rules or for advancement, that's fine. What happens to the individual that has been laid off their job, and maybe has children and a spouse at home?

A lot of companies are now administering in-house exams to prospective employees and I really like this approach. An A+ or MCP might get you an interview, but if you can't pass their exam or at least demonstrate that you have half an idea of what is expected of you, you don't get the job. Personally, I think this is the best approach to the issue.

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Transk53

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Re: Article regarding brain dumping
« Reply #4 on: February 02, 2012, 12:53:54 am »
Quote
A lot of companies are now administering in-house exams to prospective employees and I really like this approach. An A+ or MCP might get you an interview, but if you can't pass their exam or at least demonstrate that you have half an idea of what is expected of you, you don't get the job. Personally, I think this is the best approach to the issue.

Now that is a nice idea. I would have thought that CompTIA would have that type of framwork in place to ensure continuity of courses offered. Then again, they have been around for a while, probably did not forsee the world of IT as it is now back then