Author Topic: LGA 2011 Sandy Bridge E  (Read 1673 times)

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Transk53

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LGA 2011 Sandy Bridge E
« on: December 19, 2011, 06:20:45 am »
Hi all, if you wish to build a system based on Sandy Bridge E 22nm process, bare in mind that a UK based mag called Custom PC, tested a two models of the aforementioned CPU's. As with the Intel convention, this has strangley been dismissed. Both models (I7-3930K and I73930) have unlocked multis. They run hot so you will need a decent after market HSF or LC. Temps under load are ok with stock speeds, but Intel are not supplying a standard factory HSF. You will need this as an extra now. This will give you an idea of the heat issue. Going straight to water cooling means a low TDP ceiling under load. So beware of upgrading to Sandy Bridge E and stick with the 2500(k) and 2600(k) QC's for now. For gaming they are more than sufficient at the mo :)

Transk53

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Re: LGA 2011 Sandy Bridge E
« Reply #1 on: December 28, 2011, 01:46:36 pm »
Just to note that next year "Ivy Bridge" will arrive next year on a 22nm process. It looks like that there will be a E suffix as well. It remains to be seen if Intel can sort out the heat issue, especially when overclocked. It was reported to be 4.8GHz!! Stick with Sandy Bridge 32nm CPU's for the mo.

Transk53

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Sandy Bridge E and X79 Chipset
« Reply #2 on: January 24, 2012, 04:53:58 am »
Just to note, as far as I am aware, Intel have not confirmed the E as being known as "Extreme" In fact, it is more likely to be known as "Extended" due to the Core count. Good review for the enthusiast and a taste of the modern Rig.

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Re: LGA 2011 Sandy Bridge E
« Reply #3 on: January 24, 2012, 07:14:00 am »

As near as I can tell, the extreme series is designated with an X in the model number. I think the E designates "Embedded", where the CPU is mounted on the board without the benefit of a socket. Might look around for a more difinitive answer a bit later if I get a little time.
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Transk53

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Re: LGA 2011 Sandy Bridge E
« Reply #4 on: January 24, 2012, 02:50:22 pm »
Yeah but in this case with E, the X don't fit the profile with the current chips. The current QC's are still more relevant in terms of potential, they overclock better than E at the moment. Then again maybe the "Ivy Bridge E 22nm will address above all, the current thermal issue with Sandy Bridge E.

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Re: LGA 2011 Sandy Bridge E
« Reply #5 on: January 24, 2012, 03:05:48 pm »
AMD used to have identification charts available for all of their processors that defined every number and letter in their spec numbers (architecture, frequency, voltage, etc). Made it easy to tell exactly what you were working with.
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Transk53

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Re: LGA 2011 Sandy Bridge E
« Reply #6 on: January 26, 2012, 01:08:26 pm »
Yeah. With the XP Series, they made it easier due to the fact that most AMD CPU's ended up in Enthusiasts hands. That meant Overclockers because Cycle for Cycle at stock, the Intels were faster. The Presscott was a beast.